NewUrbanStreets

Sharring experiences in urban infrastructure delivery.
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The Prairie Street Icons

August 30, 2009 By: Tom Davis Category: Sidewalk Features

CIMG6966.JPGPrairie Street was home of the original Cotswold “Test Blocks” and has many amenities. In this post we will look at the “icons”.

The icons are pre-cast concrete structures on each block between Travis St. and Crawford St at Minute Maid Baseball Park. The two Test Blocks–the block either side of Main St.–have one at each end of each block. The other blocks have one each at each intersection. The planter pot on top is watered by the same irrigation system that waters the nearby new trees and planter beds.

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The Manhole Fountain

June 14, 2009 By: Tom Davis Category: Sidewalk Fountains

ThManhole cover fountains with conese fountains are not officially named the “manhole fountains” but that is appropriate as the intent was to depict two manholes where the lids were blown off during a heavy rain event–typical in a few places near here-and water gushing into the street. To add to the setting notice the “cones” -typically bright orange-surrounding the holes to warn cars. The cones are precast concrete and were also used as bollards in other areas on Preston St. See the article at this blog about the value of them as bollards. (more…)

Decorative Traffic Cone or Bollard?

May 25, 2009 By: Tom Davis Category: Sidewalk Features

Part of the theme on Preston Street in downtown Houston celebrates the water underground in an urban setting. There is more about that in the article here about the Cotswold Program.ConeBollardLeaning.jpg

Underground water in the City is usually seen when looking into a hole at a broken pipe or when a manhole lid is off and you can see inside Traffic cones are typically around the hole to warn traffic away. To symbolize those situations precast concrete cones are placed throughout the Preston St. enhancements. But a cone is not a bollard. In a few places the cones were intended to shield planter beds and keep cars in driveways. We hoped the cars would avoid them. But plants grow and street lights burn out and the cute little concrete cones can not be seen by the drivers–even those that care. (more…)